10 comments on “Model Of Helicopter

  1. How much would it cost to get into RC helicopters or airplanes as a hobby?
    I am 13 and have always been interested in I guess motors and aviation based movement. Basically long story short i want to try building an RC helicopter or airplane and want to know how much it would cost. I have around $300 or so to spend and I just want a simple start into this hobby so nothing fancy (PS i have a tiny bit of experience with aviation based RC models and i know how to fly a basic model airplane and a basic 3 channel model helicopter)

    • I would say start with elecric planes with a wide wing span they are easy to control. Also get a decent controller but not something to fancy . I was dumb and started out with a 4 channel rc helicopter and I got to say flying a real plane is easier to me then flying one of those things. First time I tried it out I pushed the throttle all the way in it went up got caught by the wind and got stuck in a tree

  2. Can you fly a model helicopter on a train?
    my friend and i at work have a bet.

    the question: can you take-off a model helicopter on a moving train and make it hover on the spot

    my answer is: yes because its in the train and everything in the train moves at the same speed.

    my friends answer is: that the helicopter will take off and smash into the back of the train

    who is right?
    please give your explenation

    thanks

    • You are right because the air inside the train is moving at the same speed as the helicopter. If you were on an open flatcar, he would be right because the air around you is sitting still in relation to the helicopter. Just like a baby can throw a bottle at mommy in the front seat while driving down the highway. Not many babies can throw faster than a car.

  3. How do helicopters fly upside down without crashing?
    I have seen it happen on TV, and my uncle assures me that his model helicopter can fly upside down. This does not make sense to me. I always thought that helicopters fly because the rotors pull them up through the sky much like a propeller pulls along. So if you turn the whole thing upside-down the thrust will be going in the opposite direction and sucking the whole helicopter downwards. Is there some trick the pilots use to fly upside-down, or do they spin the right way up again before they hit the ground?

    • Most helicopters are not designed to fly upside down as there is no reason for them to actually do this. But some have been modified to perform aerobatics. Saying that a helicopter cannot actually fly in a line constantly upside down only do a loop the loop. Their ability to be able to do this is basically a controlled free fall after the loop using the momentum to regain control. Only a skilled helicopter pilot is able to do this and it’s extremely dangerous!!

  4. How can I make a working model helicopter?
    I want to make a model helicopter that works and that I can make from scratch (NOT using kits) I have good experience with electronics and know the physics about how helicopters work and stay in flight but I can’t work out how to keep it from spinning because i don’t think I have the expertise to make a helicopter that has a tail motor.

    I was thinking of designing it to copy the American Chinook but I don’t know where to start. Please help me.

    • Counter rotating main blades. Go to http://www.horizonhobby.com and look at the E-Flite CX and CX-2. They are very stable and do not use a tail rotor. The main shaft has 2, one inside that rotates one way and an outer shaft that rotates the other way. This will be very difficult to build from scratch, but good for you taking on the challenge and good luck !!

  5. Can you fly a model helicopter on a train?
    my friend and i at work have a bet.

    the question: can you take-off a model helicopter on a moving train and make it hover on the spot

    my answer is: yes because its in the train and everything in the train moves at the same speed.

    my friends answer is: that the helicopter will take off and smash into the back of the train

    who is right?
    please give your explenation

    thanks

    • Fun question! As has been pointed out, there are a number of unspecified variables here, but I would have to say that you’re right in any case.

      *Case 1=Enclosed car. If you are in an enclosed train car, then you, your friend, and the seats, and the floor, and the model helicopter, and everything else in that car is moving at the same speed as the train. This includes the air in the train car. (It’s because you AND the air are moving along with the car that you don’t feel any wind so long as the car is enclosed.) In this case, the helicopter can lift off and hover just as it would in a no-wind situation outdoors at a park.

      (And, technically, even at the park you’re in a similar situation: The earth is rotating at something like 800 miles per hour–more or less, depending on location. So, if your friend were right, then as soon as the helicopter lifted off in the park, it would disappear at more than the speed of sound! This doesn’t happen, though, because the air in the atmosphere rotates through space along with the surface of the planet.)

      Case 2=Flatbed car. If you are on a flatbed train car, then you, your friend, and the “floor,” and the model helicopter are still moving at the same speed as the train, but you are ALSO moving forward through the air. In this case, if the helicopter lifts off without compensation for the “wind” created by the train’s movement, it will indeed seem to fly in the direction opposite the train’s movement. (It will be hovering over a single spot on the ground, but not a single spot over the train.) BUT, if the pilot of the helicopter compensates for the “wind” created by the train’s movement, then the helicopter will take off and hover over a single spot on the train–though someone standing beside the tracks would see the train moving foward and the helicopter flying forward above the train car at the same speed.

      (In reality, there are very few outdoor flying days with absolutely no wind, so most hovering actually requires compensating for wind. This means that technically most “hovering” helicopters are flying foward, or sideways, or backward, through wind in order to stay over a single spot on the ground.)

      To sum up, I think that you’re right in either case. In the first case, you would be right because in an enclosed car there would be no wind which would affect the helicopter. In the second case, you would also be right because on a open car, the helicopter wouldn’t be “hovering” if the pilot didn’t compensate for the wind in order to maintain position over a single spot.

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